We the People are Fuggin Suggin!

Fuggin Facebook Feed

August 6, 2011

Reflecting on the 66th Anniversary of the Bombing of Hiroshima


 "It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were already defeated and ready to surrender because of the effective sea blockade and the successful bombing with conventional weapons....


The lethal possibilities of atomic warfare in the future are frightening. My own feeling was that in being the first to use it, we had adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages. I was not taught to make war in that fashion, and wars cannot be won by destroying women and children." ~William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff to Presidents Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman, I Was There, pg. 441.


On August 6th, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima in Japan, killing approximately 70-80,000 immediately.  Estimates of total deaths by the end of 1945 from burns, radiation and related disease, the effects of which were aggravated by lack of medical resources, range from 90,000 to 166,000.  Some estimates state up to 200,000 had died by 1950, due to cancer and other long-term effects. Check out the BBC documentary below, and be sure to notice the Western propaganda within.





 "...in [July] 1945... Secretary of War Stimson, visiting my headquarters in Germany, informed me that our government was preparing to drop an atomic bomb on Japan. I was one of those who felt that there were a number of cogent reasons to question the wisdom of such an act. ...the Secretary, upon giving me the news of the successful bomb test in New Mexico, and of the plan for using it, asked for my reaction, apparently expecting a vigorous assent....


During his recitation of the relevant facts, I had been conscious of a feeling of depression and so I voiced to him my grave misgivings, first on the basis of my belief that Japan was already defeated and that dropping the bomb was completely unnecessary, and secondly because I thought that our country should avoid shocking world opinion by the use of a weapon whose employment was, I thought, no longer mandatory as a measure to save American lives. It was my belief that Japan was, at that very moment, seeking some way to surrender with a minimum loss of 'face'. The Secretary was deeply perturbed by my attitude..." ~Dwight Eisenhower, Mandate For Change, pg. 380